Sunday, June 20, 2021
Home Curator’s Eye Pets turned into paintings

Pets turned into paintings

 Animals used to be nothing more than food and tools. Now, every day, humans are given the opportunity to heal them.

 There is a Japanese English word called animal therapy. It refers to the practice of restoring mental health by reducing inherent stress through contact with animals. Although there is little academic evidence, people living in a pet-heavy country like modern Japan would have no doubt about the positive effects of contact with animals.

 It is interesting to note the number of people who watch other people’s pets through video sites and social networking sites. The reason why some people are bent on watching a video of a single cat for hours on end is not for entertainment, but rather for healing. Looking at the situation alone, it seems that animal therapy is possible even if humans are virtual animals.

 This article explores the relationship between animals and art, as depicted in the Lascaux and Altamira cave murals, which are said to be the beginning of art.

Inga Makarova / Inga Makarova

 Inga Makarova is an artist who works with a wide variety of animals, from typical pet animals such as dogs and cats to dangerous insects such as bees and exotic animals such as chameleons. She excels at capturing the biological characteristics of each animal and extracting commonalities with human culture, and her work has a contemporary artistic aspect that goes beyond mere depictions of animals.

Dog
80 x 60 cm

 Dogs are often depicted as motifs, perhaps because of Makarova’s emotional attachment to them. The color tone is vivid and poisonous, but the small body is somehow adorable, perhaps expressing Makarova’s love for dogs.

80 x 60 cm

For more information about the artist, click here.

Aihito Kumori

 Kumori is another artist who has acquired a deep insight into animals.

 However, in addition to Makarova’s covetous gaze on animals, the level of abstraction rises even higher, perhaps because of the deconstruction of animal forms that takes place in his mind.

 He skillfully uses the dichotomy of complex geometric line drawings and simplified motifs, static and dynamic images, to depict animals and divine beings based on animals. The various animals that Japanese people encounter in their daily lives are transformed in ways that are sometimes catchy and sometimes frightening, and the characteristics of each animal are exaggerated.

Jitsu (stay still)
116.7 x 116.7 cm

 What is also noteworthy is the way he treats animals, which are usually considered to be unconscious, as beings with a clear consciousness like humans, thereby creating a kind of characterization. Although the characterization of animals can be seen in the West as well, the exaggerated facial expressions and the spontaneous and vigorous brushwork that only the Japanese can produce are reminiscent of the caricatures of birds and animals.

Bird 10262019,
27.3 x 22 cm

For more information about the artist, click here.

Yuko Hizume

 There are artists who take a different approach to painting animals than the above two artists. Hizume is one of them.

 Hizume depicts the beauty of intelligent, wild and strong women dressed in classic Japanese and Western fashion. Flanked by animals that we rarely see directly, such as tigers, cranes, and woofers. This style of painting is said to be out of gratitude to her mother and the animals.

Afternoon Irritation
72.7 x 91 cm

 Both of the women in the motifs have a dignified appearance, and their spiritual strength comes to us from across the screen. The animals function as a medium through which this spirituality is conveyed to us. A tiger adds more power, while a lizard accelerates the feminine and unrestrained impression.

 Looking at Hizume’s works, we can share the image of the natural man and the animal, and the relationship between the two will be reaffirmed and reconsidered in the mind of the viewer.

Shu
31.8 x 41 cm

Click here for more information about the artist

 Due to the unprecedented pet boom, the number of pets kept at home exceeded 19 million in 2003, which is more than the number of children under 15 years old. The answer to the question of how to deal with animals, which are more than just food and tools, and are becoming more organically integrated into human society, may lie in art.

Shinzo Okuokahttps://www.tricera.net/
Born in 1992 in Tokyo, Japan. After studying Indian philosophy at university, he worked at a publishing company as a deputy editor of an art magazine and a shrine magazine, where he was involved in planning and editing magazines and books. 2019 he joined TRiCERA, a start-up company, where he was in charge of developing Japan's first cross-border e-commerce site specializing in contemporary art, managing artists, and launching the company's own on-demand media. He is also in charge of developing Japan's first cross-border e-commerce site specializing in contemporary art, managing artists, and launching the company's own owned media. He is a fast writer, and when he was working for a magazine, he was able to write 150 pages in a month by himself.

Most Popular

You Might Like

TRiCERA is pleased to announce the group show “Into the Blue Spring”.

TRiCERA is pleased to announce a one-week group show, "Into the Blue Spring," starting January 30. The exhibition will feature works by students who...

Osamu Watanabe: Interview with Japanese Confectionary Artist

"... Everyone has memories of sweets, don't they?"   In Japan's kawaii culture, there is one artist who can be considered a pioneer of contemporary confectionary...

Adventures in Phenomena and Imagination.

Unlike a painting, the expression of a photograph of a real object or objects is somewhat limited by the subject matter. The choice of...

Michael Toenges, “Paintings on Paper 1995-2019”

Presented by Taguchi Fine Art from August 24 to October 12.     Taguchi Fine Art is pleased to present a solo exhibition of German painter Michael...

The Reason Why We, Millennials, Should Buy Modern Art

We shape a more sophisticated future. We Millennials, including myself born in 1988, are like a hybrid of Phoebe and Rachel from FRIENDS. How?...

Don't Miss

A Tale of Poison and Purification

Born in Aichi Prefecture in 1996, Hotaru Shiro moved to Tokyo in 2019 to start her career as an artist. In March of this...

Michael Toenges, “Paintings on Paper 1995-2019”

Presented by Taguchi Fine Art from August 24 to October 12.     Taguchi Fine Art is pleased to present a solo exhibition of German painter Michael...

Osamu Watanabe: Interview with Japanese Confectionary Artist

"... Everyone has memories of sweets, don't they?"   In Japan's kawaii culture, there is one artist who can be considered a pioneer of contemporary confectionary...

“I want to paint a new picture.”

Self-taught artist Kosuke Kato is one of those young people who are passionate about studying and researching art history and the contemporary art...

Feature Post

Limited edition prints by Kana Uwatoko will be on sale.

TRiCERA is pleased to announce the sale of a limited edition print by Kana Kamitoko.   Reception period January 25, 2021 (Mon) 13:00 - February...

Up-And-Coming Digital Painters; Vibrant and Edgy

Should digital painting be considered as a part of contemporary art? Of course, there is no doubt about it. It is certainly different from...

Michael Toenges, “Paintings on Paper 1995-2019”

Presented by Taguchi Fine Art from August 24 to October 12.     Taguchi Fine Art is pleased to present a solo exhibition of German painter Michael...

6 Artwork to Create a Natural Room

Here is a collection of art that is useful for room design. Not only the visuals, but also the philosophy of the artists. In...

Editor's Choice