Sunday, March 7, 2021
Home Curator’s Eye The Artist as Intermediary

The Artist as Intermediary

Asami Asama, who works with embroidery techniques, describes herself as a “vessel.” According to Asami Asama, it is important for her to stay true to her inspirations in creating her works. She describes herself as having a shamanistic style, which is why her works maintain their purity. Asami Asama’s work focuses on embroidery, was this something you learned from the beginning? -No, I started out by drawing pictures by myself. I used to work as an illustrator, but I wanted to create works with my own original expression, which is why I shifted to art work instead of working for clients. I switched to embroidery when my child got sick. During that time, I hadn’t made anything even though I wanted to. However, it was hard to find time and space to draw. I decided that embroidery was the only way I could balance my life as an artist with my personal life. Honkadori Bacchus, 33×33cm So, embroidery was an artistic expression that you could easily incorporate into your daily life. Are you self-taught in embroidery? -Yes, I am self-taught, so I can’t teach others even if they ask me to give workshops. I have my own rules and methods, but nothing is set in stone. The way I make my work is something I’ve encountered in my own life, so it may be different from someone who is learning embroidery properly. Besides, I value expression, so I don’t want to be a craft or handcrafter. As long as the work is “using the technique of embroidery,” the perspective of an artist is essential. What do you think about that? -My work is more of an inspiration. It may sound strange to call it shamanic, but it’s more like an idea that “comes down” to me. Motifs come into my head, and then I have to figure out how to make them come out in my work. That is my creative style. Enlightenment, 33×33cm In other words, I feel like the artist stands between the inspiration and the work. That’s just my case, but that’s why the state of mind is so important. I think that the artist’s mental state and other invisible things are connected to the work. Therefore, when I am in an unstable state, I try not to make any work because I feel that it will be reflected in my work. I often do a “purification ritual” in the morning, and I think it’s important to get pure inspiration and how pure the work will be. I used to have a complex about people saying that I looked more like a shaman than an artist, but now I don’t care about that, and I can make much better work than I could when I was thinking in my head, and I even feel a kind of identity. The flow of my work is “thinking” -> “sketching” -> “embroidering on canvas”. I always get new inspirations and ideas in the middle of the night or at dawn, and I sketch them right away so I don’t forget them. Honkadori Giuliano, 33×33cm Last but not least, is there anything you would like to change in “The”? -No, not really, because I have a prototype for my work, and it’s a matter of how I can catch it and transfer it to my work. That said, I always take care of my mind and body. I don’t think I can make good work if I’m not in good shape physically or mentally. It’s very important to be a good “vessel”.

Shinzo Okuokahttps://www.tricera.net/
Born in 1992 in Tokyo, Japan. After studying Indian philosophy at university, she worked at a publishing company as a deputy editor of an art magazine and a shrine magazine, where she was involved in planning and editing magazines and books. 2019 she joined TRiCERA, a start-up company, where she was in charge of developing Japan's first cross-border e-commerce site specializing in contemporary art, managing artists, and launching the company's own on-demand media. He is also in charge of developing Japan's first cross-border e-commerce site specializing in contemporary art, managing artists, and launching the company's own owned media. He is a fast writer, and when he was working for a magazine, he was able to write 150 pages in a month by himself.

Most Popular

You Might Like

Is there color in black and white?-Focusing on pencil drawings and paintings

 In the 1560s, high quality graphite was discovered in the Borrodale mines in North Camperland, England.  The pencil was cut into long, thin strips, wrapped...

Quick Insight vol.1 – yuta okuda-

Active on the Asian art scene in Japan and Taiwan, yuta okuda attempts to depict and affirm the beauty of the natural order through...

Review of the exhibition at Yutaka Kikutake Gallery, “In Need of a Nail

Installation View, Nerhol 'For want of a nail', 2019 ©️Nerhol Photo: Shintaro Yamanaka (Qsyum!) Courtesy of Yutaka Kikutake Gallery From June 6 to...

An up-and-coming digital painter who dazzles the eye

Should digital painting be considered as a part of contemporary art? Of course, there is no doubt about it. It is certainly different from...

The Unique and Fascinating World of Paper Art – Part 1

Did you enjoy crafting with paper as a child? I certainly did! Folding, cutting, gluing, assembling, coloring, and drawing. The possibilities seemed to be...

Don't Miss

TRiCERA artists appear on Japanese TV program “Pre-Breakthrough”.

There are over 100 artists participating in the TRiCERA service, some of whom were featured in the Japanese TV show "Break Senya" called "The...

The Story of “Blue” in Art

The life that we see is incredibly vivid. However, in our daily lives, only artists and designers are conscious of color. Let's take...

Exhibition to Support Passionate Young Artists in Tokyo

The 21st "1_WALL" Graphics Exhibition Installation View, "The 21st "1_WALL" Graphics Exhibition", 2019 ©️Guardian Garden Courtesy of Guardian Garden. Young artists are always...

The Shape of Time – Group show by Takumi Saito, Samehoshi, Manami Azuma, Kanaewu Hayashi, Azusa Nozawa –

TRiCERA is pleased to announce a group show of multiple works by five artists: Takumi Saito, Samehoshi, Manami Azuma, Kanae Taku Hayashi, and Azusa...

Feature Post

Over the Shape and Color of Love

 While the themes that artists take up may be grandiose, the source of their creations may be surprisingly familiar. This is especially true of...

Joi Murugavell – Maze of Joy

Australian artist Joi Murugavell creates colorful works of art that are bold, fun and full of unique characters. She began her career as an...

Front and back of the portrait

Ikeda ayako is a painter who outputs her emotions in the form of portraits. She does not aim to express the details of...

KIAF SEOUL 2019, one of the largest international art fairs in Korea

The 18th Korea International Art Fair Held   KIAF (Korea International Art Fair), one of the most famous art fairs in Korea, was held in Seoul,...

Editor's Choice